Posts Tagged ‘Church’

Children in Worship–Part Three

February 5, 2009

kids-jumpingOur church is thinking about some big changes. One of the areas under consideration is worship. It’s being suggested that we combine our two services into one. Also, that we combine the various styles of music. And, finally, that we move the time of our children’s Sunday school to the hour before or after the worship service. If we did so, it would mean that our children would be in the sanctuary with us during the entire service. Chew on that thought for a moment. In this post, I’m going to focus on children in worship. Here is an outstanding short piece on children in worship.

Children in Worship–How will we cope?

If you are like me, then the first question is, ‘How will the poor parent of the child who stays in the sanctuary for the full service cope with the change?

That’s a very, very important question. How will parents of young children cope with their little one being by their side for an hour of worship. How will the child sit through four or five hymns, an anthem, offering, prayer, and a sermon?

A Fresh Perspective

It’s good to remember that not all churches have Sunday school. That is, there have always been churches where kids stay with mom and dad or grandma and grandpa (or another loving, caring adult) during the full worship service. These congregations have never dismissed the children. And, these congreagation don’t exist half way around the world, on another continent. They are right here in Canada. The reason I point this fact out is to give us some perspective. The way we have done things in the past is not the only possible way of doing things. There are alternatives that work well. We may be able to learn a thing or two from them. But in order to do so, personal humility is required.

Parenting from the Pew

book-parenting-in-the-pew1Also, there are resources that can help us re-think the situation. One book that Terri, my wife, has found particularly helpful has been Parenting in the Pew by Robbie Castleman, the mother of two sons, now grown. She speaks from experience as she provides advice to parents with little children. Her advice is simple, solid, and practical. Along the way, she offers an extremely valuable insight. Worship is never easy, contrary to popular myth.

Worship is work, hard work. It is also rewarding work. To worship the Lord ‘in spirit and truth’ does not come easily, and it certainly does not come naturally to us. It is difficult to worship on the leftover energy of a long week and a late Saturday. The Sunday morning encounter is worthy of our best energy, not our least.

The Lord of life promises to accompany us in worship. we will come upon unexpected stores of energy when we remember that worship is a joyous privilege. His mighty energy will be at work in us to revitalize our weary spirits. We will find rest for our souls.

The King’s House

cross-and-crownWhen Terri prepares our children for Sunday morning, she begins the process Saturday night by laying out the outfits the children will wear the next day. They see her do this and usually ask what’s going on? She’s then able to explain that we all are getting ready for tomorrow. ‘What’s tomorrow?,’ they ask. ‘Oh, well,’ their mom replies, ‘That’s the day we go to the King’s house, to worship the King of Kings.’ This plants the seed in their mind. Sunday is no ordinary day. Great things await them.

This isn’t a fabrication. Terri is not spinning a tale of make-believe. Her remarks are based on the witness of Scripture. The Lord God is King and his people, who are sealed by the Holy Spirit, are the new temple of the Lord. Christ promised that whenever two or three are gathered together in his name, he will be there. So, in a very real way, when we gather in the sanctuary as the people whom God has redeemed through the shed blood of the Lamb, we are, in fact, in the presence of the King of kings and Lord of lords. We are in the Kings house.

What an awesome and thrilling, humbling and mysterious thing we do when we come to worship him in our sanctuary. If we convey this to our children, they will slowly begin to appreciate being with you, in the pew, to worship their God, too.

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